Posts

‘3-Step Process to Calm Anxiety,’ Thrive Global.

Many of us have felt anxiety at different times in our lives to differing degrees. I think we can all agree it doesn’t feel nice at all. For some it can present as a shortness of breath, a rapid heart beat, a knot in the stomach or nausea, a racing mind, or a feeling of loss of reality and perception. However you may feel it, the great news is there is something you can do to help yourself in these moments. Let’s start by understanding anxiety.

Anxiety put really simply is when our mind runs ahead to imagining the worst-case scenario. We often then believe this worst-case scenario is true (because it feels that way) which can lead to further anxiety or a panic attack. Our mind has become disassociated from our body and from reality.

For example, you may need to resolve a conflict with a friend, family member or your boss. Feeling nervous or having a reasonable amount of fear can be normal. Anxiety is when you let your mind race ahead in to the worst-case scenario where you imagine it escalating to an argument that you feel you can’t come back from resulting in loss of trust, loss of friendship, loss of job or worse. This is an anxiety-driven thought that may also cause you to feel unable to even attempt to resolve the conflict at all.

A more current scenario in our new world of COVID19 could be that you have a fear of going out in public that escalates to an anxiety-driven thought. It can be normal to feel fear right now. An anxiety driven-thought may be that you think if you go on public transport and touch the handrail on a train or bus that you will get infected by the virus and either get sick and potentially die yourself or can cause someone else to. If this escalates you may feel unable to leave the house and develop a fear of public spaces or people. In the weeks or months to come as the situation changes, you also may still hold on to your anxiety and find it difficult to re-enter the world.

Anxiety-driven thoughts can be about anything, from COVID19 related issues to love or family relationships, jobs, shopping, driving and anything else. I want to teach you a 3-step process to help combat anxiety and calm down the escalation from a thought or fear to an anxiety-driven thought.

Many people think that Step 1 is taking deep breaths but if you are feeling anxious or having a panic attack, you are not yet ready or often even able to take a deep breath.

STEP 1: GROUNDING.

We want to bring your mind back from being dissociated or disconnected from reality and your surroundings and get grounded. If you’re sitting put your hands on the ground until you can actually feel it. You can also grab your body­ – your arms or your thighs to help you find your body again.

If you are standing you can say, “My feet are on the ground, my feet are on the ground, my feet are on the ground.” Anything that brings you back to your physical body. Whilst you’re doing this grounding, look around the room or the space that you are in. Name three or four things out loud that you can see. Example: “I can see my kettle, my shoes, my book, my phone. I can see my kettle, my shoes, my book, my phone.” If you are naming the things that are physically in front of you, your mind is no longer disconnected, your mind is back with your body because you’re in reality seeing and feeling what is in front of you.

STEP 2: BREATHE.

Now you’re ready for a breath. Now that you’re ‘back’ you can know where your lungs are, where your heart, and where your breath is. Take three to five deep breaths.

STEP 3 – REALITY CHECK

Ask yourself questions. What do I KNOW to be TRUE? What are the FACTS? Facts NOT thoughts. In the example above about wanting to resolve a conflict, what are the facts? Fact: You had a conflict. The conflict is unresolved on your side. The rest are thoughts, fears and anxieties. You do not KNOW how the other person is feeling, what will happen when you meet, whether it will escalate or de-escalate or anything else. Stick to the facts – there was a conflict. That is much less scary than where your anxiety-driven thoughts went.

In example two on our COVID19 related situation, you fear leaving the house. What are the facts? Is it a fact that if you leave the house you will definitely become infected? No. Is it a fact that if you touch a surface in a public space you will definitely become infected? No. Is it a fact that the virus does exist? Yes (depending on your belief system). Does that mean you have it? No. Are there safety precautions you can take? Yes. Again the facts are much less scary than where the anxiety-driven thoughts led you.

Don’t let fears become anxiety-driven thoughts. When we look at the facts, there are usually very, very few facts and the rest are thoughts and fears that lead to anxiety driven thoughts.

For any situation where you feel anxiety rising, whether you are sixteen or sixty, try and remember this 3-Step Process. 1. Grounding. 2. Breathe. 3. Reality Check. This should help calm down your situation so you are able to make decisions that are reasonable for you.

Source: ‘3-Step Process to Calm Anxiety,’/ Thrive Global.

The Key Is Self-Awareness  – Podcast interview on Fit for Joy, U.S.

In May I was interviewed by Valeria Teles, a Well-Being Coach, Author and Podcaster in the U.S. She wanted to talk to me about my book and course ‘The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens’ and together we discussed the mental health and emotional well-being of adolescence with a focus on understanding oneself and one’s friendships.

 

In this episode, Valeria Teles interviews Romi Grossberg.

Teenagers are introduced to the ideas of emotional intelligence, self-awareness and self-understanding: To learning greater life skills and coping strategies to not merely survive school and home life but to thrive socially, emotionally and mentally.

Your E.Q. (emotional intelligence) is based on self-awareness. It is understanding your emotions and why you react to people or situations the way you do.

Increasing your awareness is important for the very simple reason that it ultimately makes life easier! It is difficult to notice the good or acknowledge the ‘not so good’ in life if you aren’t aware in the first place. Understanding and increasing your awareness and learning some of the tools in this book can help you deal with pressure, anxiety, school life, friendships, relationships, arguments, family life and growing up.” She writes in her opening chapter.

‘The Key’ is a guidebook addressing mental, social, and emotional health. Romi believes that in today’s current climate of an elevating mental health crisis amongst adolescence worldwide, it is vital young people are adequately equipped to handle their thoughts and emotions as they move through this developmental stage of identity.

Teens can learn that even seemingly complex issues or problems can be taught and dealt with in very real terms with practical guidance, learning, activities, videos, and discussion.

Romi’s book ‘The Key’ is broken into three sections: 1. My Friendships, 2. Me and 3. My Family. She begins with friendships because friendship is the most important thing during adolescence and so the best way to engage. “It’s not exactly a lie when we say what we know other people want to hear, but it’s not always the truth either. It is us trying to fit in, not stand out, be cool. We all do it. But wouldn’t it be cooler if we didn’t have to always concentrate or try so hard? If we could be honest with ourselves and our friends and know that everything would just be okay?” – writes Romi Grossberg.

‘The Key’ includes over twenty topics including negative thought patterns, unconditional love, bullying, effective communication, anxiety, trusting yourself, and many more.

Source: The Key Is Self-Awareness  — Fit for Joy

‘Teen Mental Health,’ Medium

There is a growing mental health crisis with our teenagers and young people across the world. In Australia alone 1 in 4 adolescents will experience mental health problems this year and suicide is the most common cause of death for 15–24 year olds. The stats are alarming. One person is one too many.

In my experience with counselling teenagers I have had clients as young as 12 years old suffering from anxiety, clients at 13 believing that their parents divorce was their fault, at 16 not being able to look past a pimple or scar to see who they are as a person and at 17 wondering why they should get out of bed when “today is just going to be as bad as yesterday.” I have worked with adults who at 30 were still stuck in negative thought patterns, at 40 were still traumatised from being bullied at school, at 50 not feeling worthy of love and even at 70 still haunted by teenage family abuse.

None of us are ‘immune to life’ — to traumas, to ‘bad things happening’, to feeling like we have failed, to holding on to past hurts and to the complexities of navigating teenage friendships.

But this is not all doom and gloom.

Life doesn’t have to be this way. The problem is that quite often we don’t know what it is we can try. In those moments we have lost perspective. We have lost faith in the world and we have lost trust in ourselves.

My past clients spurred me to write my latest book ‘The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens.’ The most common sentence I was hearing from adults after working together was, “I wish I had learnt those things when I was younger,” and from that I set out to write. The frustration I felt at working with adults who had been carrying their life’s anxieties and traumas around for 10, 20, even 40 years was deeply saddening to me. Five-minutes is too long.

I believe the answer is in education. Not education that says ‘go to school’ but emotional intelligence education, social-emotional education, life education, education of the self, the heart and the soul.

A friend of mine, Kosal Khiev once wrote a poem ‘Moments In Between the Nights’ and that title alone springs to mind when I think about educating teens. It’s not in the ‘going to class,’ but the moments in between — the moments when no one is looking, when your mind suddenly turns, when doubt, fear, embarrassment, a memory, sadness, anxiety or negative thoughts kick in. It’s in those moments that we need to learn the self-awareness, the skills, tools and coping strategies to find our own balance again.

We can teach young people how to gain perspective, how to process their thoughts, emotions, behaviours and understand how and why they react to situations the way they do. We can teach them to understand and redefine terms such as success and failure. We can teach them self enquiry and self awareness, teach them how to better understand themselves, better understand friendships and the roles they play, that there is always someone they haven’t thought of they can talk to, something else they can try. We can teach them how to breathe — to calm down and to steady the mind. And to remind them that they are in control, that they have choice — choice in their actions, reactions, thoughts and behaviours. That there is ALWAYS something they can do. Life doesn’t happen TO us, we need to learn how to get back in the driver’s seat.

Through self-awareness we can create behaviour change but we cannot change what we are not aware of.

Yes we can even break out of negative thought patterns or better understand and cope with anxiety. There are simple steps that can be followed and in my book and videos I guide teens step-by-step in a very simple, practical and no bullshit way. I don’t brush over topics or say “Oh you’ll be okay.” he book gently holds their hand and takes them on a journey of self discovery where they learn to better understand themselves, find their strengths and resilience and get back in control of themselves.

In psychology terms, adolescence is the developmental stage of identity. Who am I? It is a powerful thing to begin to answer that question as a teen. How many adults can truly answer it?

* The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens is not a substitute for a specialised mental health counsellor or diagnosed mental health conditions.

‘Teen Mental Health’ was posted in Medium in September 2019.

Social Emotional Tools for Teens – Podcast interview on Wellthy Living, Australia.

In the six days I was in Melbourne this week launching my new book ‘THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens’ at the Cultures of Thinking conference, I was approached by Lisa Entwisle from Wellthy Living; Guiding you to Live a Wealthy Life, through Connection to Self, Others and the World around you to do a podcast interview.

 

 

Episode #28: Social Emotional Tools for Teens.

August 2019.

Mental health and emotional well being are getting lots of air time in the world right now…and rightly so. We are living in a world where anxiety, depression and suicide rates are continually rising.

In this episode I chat with Social worker, author, keynote speaker and workshop facilitator Romi Grossberg to discuss her fabulous new book “the key – a social emotional toolkit for teens – which aim to teach teenagers self awareness, emotional intelligence and practical life coping skills to help reduce the rates of mental illness.

 

Lisa Entwisle – Podcast host and founder of Wellthy Living: “My mantra is “connection is medicine and I hope the content of these episodes can inform and inspire you to live a meaningful, connected and wellthy life.”

THE KEY: Hear what the students had to say

Teaching TEENAGERS about EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE is no easy task, but I was up for the challenge.

My latest book THE KEY became the workbook in my curriculum that I recently taught to grade 7 (12-13 year-olds) at Bialik College in Melbourne, the top academic school in the State.

But academia doesn’t factor when talking about emotions, as the Head of Middle School discovered when he attended one of my classes to find that it wasn’t the usual ‘smart kids’ putting their hands up, but everyone else also.

One-hour weekly classes, over a ten-week period, teaching roughly 75 students in total.

We truly started from the beginning:

“Does anyone know what emotional intelligence is?”

The response was 100% “no”.

As with every topic, they were asked to write down what they thought it might mean before bringing it in for a group discussion.

A large range of topics were covered using the tools of writing therapy, discussion, youtube, some activities, and journaling homework.

This course was about discovering your identity and thinking for yourself. There was no right or wrong, nothing was being marked or graded, this was about YOU, your thoughts, feelings, questions and concerns. Who are you? All big topics but when broken down in to smaller topics, it all can just make sense.

It is impossible to wrap up the course in one piece of writing so I will share with you some student feedback given to me on a few of the topics covered.

ON IDENTITY:

“I can be myself. I don’t need to hide anything”

POSITIVE THINKING:

“I thought I couldn’t do it (a task) but then I changed my thought pattern in to a positive one and I did it”

FRIENDSHIP:

“I started being more honest with my friends and they were honest to me and we made a stronger friendship”

ON SUCCESS AND FAILURE:

“I used to think I constantly failed but it really depends on how you define things”

FRIENDSHIP:

“Instead of saying ‘no’ to someone, I helped them with what they needed. It made me feel like a better person and a helpful person”

JEALOUSY AND ENVY:

“I watched something and I didn’t feel jealous and it felt really good”

LEARNING BREATH:

“I did better in a test because I took deep breaths first and felt much more calm”

TONE OF VOICE:

“I stopped a fight from happening by changing the tone in my voice”

APOLOGIES:

“I apologised to someone and I meant it for the first time ever”

EMPATHY:

“When walking down the street, I saw a homeless guy so I went to Coles and bought him a loaf of bread and vegemite”

TONE OF VOICE:

“I have used a different tone of voice with my siblings this week and we have had less arguments and a much better relationship”

NEGATIVE THOUGHT PATTERNS:

“I was disappointed with myself and used the 4-step process to feel better”

JEALOUSY AND ENVY:

“I got a mark on a test and my friend got higher and I was fine instead of jealous”

TONE OF VOICE:

“I now get in to less fights with my family with understanding my tone of voice”

FAMILY:

“That my parents divorce was not my fault”

A few other topics covered: Choices, Unconditional Love, Comparisons, Happiness, Sadness and Depression.

NEXT STEP?

To get this curriculum in to EVERY school. Any suggestions, advice, partnerships welcome.

Pages

The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens

The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens



A guidebook and resource for teenagers, parents, teachers and counsellors and can be taught in schools and community groups.

T

HE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens is a guidebook that covers all of those topics we just never learnt in school. It has over twenty topics under the umbrella of emotional intelligence; learning how to understand ourselves better and the world around us. THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens guides students through important life skills, teaching coping strategies on various aspects of growing up through teenage years. 

Until now, I have taught THE KEY (1st Edition) myself as a 10-week program in 2017 and 2018 at Bialik College, the top school in Victoria Australia. This second edition: ‘THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens’ launched in 2019 includes more activities, writing exercises, re-cap sections, youtube videos and discussion points. 

My aim in doing so is to reach more teenagers by making it easily accessible and digestible to more students and more teachers. This second edition holds all of the necessary information to be taught without my physical presence. It includes numerous videos I have made to explain more tricky topics such as understanding anxiety, negative thoughts, three different types of calming breathing techniques and more.

There is something for everyone.

Whilst I am still available to teach the course myself or run workshops on specific topics, redesigning THE KEY helps me achieve my larger goal – to reach more young people and help them lead a more socially emotionally healthy life. My dream is to have it translated in to numerous languages and available worldwide.

The language is simple and the guidance is practical. For younger teens it is a great introduction to the new world of understanding emotions and a useful ‘go to’ manual for when things arise. For mid and older teens it can be like having a personal counsellor on hand with tips and tools for handling different emotions and situations.

If you are a teacher, parent, educator, teen counsellor, school psychologist or teenager – this book is for you.



“The Key engages students to better understand their thoughts, emotions, behaviours, actions, reactions and how they interact with the school, their friends and with their parents at home. Romi’s aim is to increase self-awareness and create behaviour change at home, at school and out in the world. Clearly the students changed from some negative thoughts to positive ones as well as treating their peers and parents with more gratitude. Romi has changed a number of students in a positive manner and I commend her on all that she has achieved.”

Ian PoyserAssistant Principal-Pastoral Care Head of Middle School, Bialik College.

“The Key is very readable. (Romi) Grossberg addresses her teenage audience in a language that is unpatronizing while presenting complex issues and concepts with exceptional clarity.

The Key never offers bland, “look on the bright side” advice. Grossberg delivers a series of common-sense self-care strategies in a clear and comforting manner designed to help put adolescent problems in perspective. Moreover, she provides her readers with the strategies for practical problem-solving and finding solutions to stressful situations. The author also gives teenagers terrific tips on becoming more balanced and goal-oriented. As the readers navigate the activities they can come to powerful and meaningful decisions and take greater control of their lives.”

Kevin MorleyAuthor, Oxford University Press Independent Education Consultant

“Today’s teens are anxious and stressed. The pressure to keep up – both in school and online – has led to a mounting mental health crisis in schools and universities worldwide. It’s clear we need to take a preventative approach, one that will help our students find healthy ways to cope. Social and emotional learning provides the framework to get us there, but finding ways to get students onboard can be tough.

The Key is full of creative resources and strategies to help teens take ownership over their mental and emotional health, preparing them for life both in school and beyond.”

Amy Lauren SmithConsultant and Education Editor



Below are fifteen videos matched to the topics in your book THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens. Just click on the numbered video when you come across ‘watch video’ in your book. Videos 6 to 15 are ‘locked’ due to privacy. Please register or sign-in to view them.

The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens

The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens



An interactive guidebook written for teenagers. A resource for parents, teachers and teen counsellors.

T

HE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens addresses many obstacles and difficulties adolescence face in emotional and mental health and provides them with practical and real-life steps toward greater health and confidence.

The Key engages teenagers using self enquiry and self awareness to better understand themselves, their thoughts, actions and reactions, giving them back a sense of self control. It offers practical guidance and strategies, putting seemingly complex issues in to perspective through learning, sharing, writing therapy, activities and fifteen videos.

With over 20 themes, The Key addresses topics such as anxiety and stress, negative thought patterns, exam preparation, controlled breathing, calming down, school, friendships, how to trust yourself, communicate effectively, understand sibling rivalry or a parents’ divorce and so much more.

The Key offers practical step-by-step guidance in how to lead a socially emotionally healthy life. In a world where mental health in adolescence is on the rise, this book aims to equip teenagers with the skills they need to thrive in school, in the home and in life.

If you are a teenager trying to understand yourself – your friendships, handle pressure, have good family relationships, deal with anxieties and get through school and life in a stress-free way, then this is for you.

If you are a parent wanting to assist, support and understand your teen better, then this book is for you.

If you are an educator, teen counsellor or school psychologist looking for a new resource full of activities, videos and practical explanations, then this book is for you.

If your school is interested in The Key, it can be taught in the classroom as a full course or as customised workshops by myself, a teacher or counsellor. Email: romigrossberg09@gmail.com



“The Key engages students to better understand their thoughts, emotions, behaviours, actions, reactions and how they interact with the school, their friends and with their parents at home. Romi’s aim is to increase self-awareness and create behaviour change at home, at school and out in the world. Clearly the students changed from some negative thoughts to positive ones as well as treating their peers and parents with more gratitude. Romi has changed a number of students in a positive manner and I commend her on all that she has achieved.”

Ian PoyserAssistant Principal-Pastoral Care Head of Middle School, Bialik College.

“The Key is very readable. (Romi) Grossberg addresses her teenage audience in a language that is unpatronizing while presenting complex issues and concepts with exceptional clarity.

The Key never offers bland, “look on the bright side” advice. Grossberg delivers a series of common-sense self-care strategies in a clear and comforting manner designed to help put adolescent problems in perspective. Moreover, she provides her readers with the strategies for practical problem-solving and finding solutions to stressful situations. The author also gives teenagers terrific tips on becoming more balanced and goal-oriented. As the readers navigate the activities they can come to powerful and meaningful decisions and take greater control of their lives.”

Kevin MorleyAuthor, Oxford University Press Independent Education Consultant

“Today’s teens are anxious and stressed. The pressure to keep up – both in school and online – has led to a mounting mental health crisis in schools and universities worldwide. It’s clear we need to take a preventative approach, one that will help our students find healthy ways to cope. Social and emotional learning provides the framework to get us there, but finding ways to get students onboard can be tough.

The Key is full of creative resources and strategies to help teens take ownership over their mental and emotional health, preparing them for life both in school and beyond.”

Amy Lauren SmithConsultant and Education Editor



Below are fifteen videos matched to the topics in your book THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens. Just click on the numbered video when you come across ‘watch video’ in your book. Videos 6 to 15 are ‘locked’ due to privacy. Please register or sign-in to view them.

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The Key-JULY 2019

The Key, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens



A guidebook and resource for teenagers, parents, teachers and counsellors and can be taught in schools and community groups.

T

HE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens is a guidebook that covers all of those topics we just never learnt in school. It has over twenty topics under the umbrella of emotional intelligence; learning how to understand ourselves better and the world around us. THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens guides students through important life skills, teaching coping strategies on various aspects of growing up through teenage years. 

Until now, I have taught THE KEY (1st Edition) myself as a 10-week program in 2017 and 2018 at Bialik College, the top school in Victoria Australia. This second edition: ‘THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens’ launched in 2019 includes more activities, writing exercises, re-cap sections, youtube videos and discussion points. 

My aim in doing so is to reach more teenagers by making it easily accessible and digestible to more students and more teachers. This second edition holds all of the necessary information to be taught without my physical presence. It includes numerous videos I have made to explain more tricky topics such as understanding anxiety, negative thoughts, three different types of calming breathing techniques and more.

There is something for everyone.

Whilst I am still available to teach the course myself or run workshops on specific topics, redesigning THE KEY helps me achieve my larger goal – to reach more young people and help them lead a more socially emotionally healthy life. My dream is to have it translated in to numerous languages and available worldwide.

The language is simple and the guidance is practical. For younger teens it is a great introduction to the new world of understanding emotions and a useful ‘go to’ manual for when things arise. For mid and older teens it can be like having a personal counsellor on hand with tips and tools for handling different emotions and situations.

If you are a teacher, parent, educator, teen counsellor, school psychologist or teenager – this book is for you.

THE KEY has been taught in workshop or full course form at:

Bialik College, Australia. 2017, 2018.

PanyaDee International School, Thailand. 2019.

THE KEY has been presented at:

The Cultures of Thinking Conference, Australia. 2019.

PHASE International Education Conference, Hong Kong. 2019.



“The Key engages students to better understand their thoughts, emotions, behaviours, actions, reactions and how they interact with the school, their friends and with their parents at home. Romi’s aim is to increase self-awareness and create behaviour change at home, at school and out in the world. Clearly the students changed from some negative thoughts to positive ones as well as treating their peers and parents with more gratitude. Romi has changed a number of students in a positive manner and I commend her on all that she has achieved.”

Ian PoyserAssistant Principal-Pastoral Care Head of Middle School, Bialik College.

“The Key is very readable. (Romi) Grossberg addresses her teenage audience in a language that is unpatronizing while presenting complex issues and concepts with exceptional clarity.

The Key never offers bland, “look on the bright side” advice. Grossberg delivers a series of common-sense self-care strategies in a clear and comforting manner designed to help put adolescent problems in perspective. Moreover, she provides her readers with the strategies for practical problem-solving and finding solutions to stressful situations. The author also gives teenagers terrific tips on becoming more balanced and goal-oriented. As the readers navigate the activities they can come to powerful and meaningful decisions and take greater control of their lives.”

Kevin MorleyAuthor, Oxford University Press Independent Education Consultant

“Today’s teens are anxious and stressed. The pressure to keep up – both in school and online – has led to a mounting mental health crisis in schools and universities worldwide. It’s clear we need to take a preventative approach, one that will help our students find healthy ways to cope. Social and emotional learning provides the framework to get us there, but finding ways to get students onboard can be tough.

The Key is full of creative resources and strategies to help teens take ownership over their mental and emotional health, preparing them for life both in school and beyond.”

Amy Lauren SmithConsultant and Education Editor



Below are fifteen YouTube videos matched to the topics in your book THE KEY, A Social Emotional Toolkit for Teens. Just click on the numbered video when you come across ‘watch video’ in your book. Videos 11 and 13 are ‘locked’ due to privacy. As the reader of THE KEY, you are invited to register and be able to view them.

 The Key – Video 01: Hello!

The Key – Video 02: Who am I and why I wrote the book

The Key – Video 03: Unlocked: What’s in the Curriculum

The Key – Video 04: What teenagers think

The Key – Video 05: Finding a Counsellor is like shopping for shoes

The Key – Video 06: Learning Belly Breaths

The Key – Video 07: Breathing with colours

The Key – Video 08: Mindfulness Meditation

The Key – Video 09: Let’s understand anxiety

The Key – Video 10: Understanding Negative Thoughts

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The Key – Video 12: Tone of Voice

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Inside Out Movie Clip Sadness Comforts Bing Bong

Inside Out – Sadness Saves Riley