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‘3 Ways to Step into 2021, Without the Weight of 2020,’ Thrive Global.

2020 felt like a pretty horrible year to most people no doubt. Understandably, we just want to walk (or run!) away from it.

As much as we would like to switch off the memories, we can’t. Carrying the feelings, fear or anxiety of the past year into 2021 won’t benefit us as individuals, or as a collective.

So how can we prepare for 2021?

The reality of the world right now is that many of us will be spending what is normally a huge celebration – New Years Eve, alone or in small groups. Here are 3 things we can do on our own, with a friend or with a family member on new years eve itself, or during this week.

Grab a pen and 3 pieces of paper and let’s begin.

1. Saying Goodbye to 2020

Write down what you would like to shed. Think about your emotions, thoughts and feelings. We can’t get rid of what actually happened, the loss or the pandemic, but we can shed the anger, frustration, sadness or despair. Layer by layer, a little at a time, we can let go of the feelings associated. Write them down, find your words, express, process, let go.

With 2020’s pandemic spilling in to 2021, all we can control right now is us. Our thoughts, feelings, actions, reactions, behaviour and style of communication. Whatever did not serve you in 2020, now is the time to make peace with it. 2020 is over and it is time to let go.

Burn that letter as you release it from your mind, body and soul.

2. Find your Silver Linings.

Write down any silver linings you found this year. It may be hard for some people, particularly if you lost a loved one, a job or a home. But please try.

Did you learn something positive about yourself? Did you have more time to reflect? Find space to grow within? Time to start a new hobby? Become closer (even over phone/video) with a family member? Rekindle an old friendship? Have more time to spend with your children? Meet your neighbours? Realise you are more resilient than you thought? Or it could be just watching on tv as different cities publicly applauded the front line workers or sang from balconies to share love and compassion with each other.

I have clients who lost a family member but rekindled other family relationships in the grieving process, clients who were isolated and scared and found strength they didn’t know they had, and clients who through tragedy found clarity, as their sense of perspective shifted.

You can burn this one or choose to keep it.

3. Find Gratitude

Write a gratitude list. When the world seems dark and the days long, it is good to ask yourself What am I grateful for? and write your answer.

Let’s start 2021 on a positive note.

Why not stick this on your fridge, on your mirror or in your bag?

Let’s shed the negativity of 2020, find the moments that warmed our heart and remember what we are grateful for as we move into 2021 with an open heart and mind.

 

by Romi Grossberg.

Photo by Anthony R Turner, Art of Love Photography.

 

‘3-Step Process to Calm Anxiety,’ Thrive Global.

Many of us have felt anxiety at different times in our lives to differing degrees. I think we can all agree it doesn’t feel nice at all. For some it can present as a shortness of breath, a rapid heart beat, a knot in the stomach or nausea, a racing mind, or a feeling of loss of reality and perception. However you may feel it, the great news is there is something you can do to help yourself in these moments. Let’s start by understanding anxiety.

Anxiety put really simply is when our mind runs ahead to imagining the worst-case scenario. We often then believe this worst-case scenario is true (because it feels that way) which can lead to further anxiety or a panic attack. Our mind has become disassociated from our body and from reality.

For example, you may need to resolve a conflict with a friend, family member or your boss. Feeling nervous or having a reasonable amount of fear can be normal. Anxiety is when you let your mind race ahead in to the worst-case scenario where you imagine it escalating to an argument that you feel you can’t come back from resulting in loss of trust, loss of friendship, loss of job or worse. This is an anxiety-driven thought that may also cause you to feel unable to even attempt to resolve the conflict at all.

A more current scenario in our new world of COVID19 could be that you have a fear of going out in public that escalates to an anxiety-driven thought. It can be normal to feel fear right now. An anxiety driven-thought may be that you think if you go on public transport and touch the handrail on a train or bus that you will get infected by the virus and either get sick and potentially die yourself or can cause someone else to. If this escalates you may feel unable to leave the house and develop a fear of public spaces or people. In the weeks or months to come as the situation changes, you also may still hold on to your anxiety and find it difficult to re-enter the world.

Anxiety-driven thoughts can be about anything, from COVID19 related issues to love or family relationships, jobs, shopping, driving and anything else. I want to teach you a 3-step process to help combat anxiety and calm down the escalation from a thought or fear to an anxiety-driven thought.

Many people think that Step 1 is taking deep breaths but if you are feeling anxious or having a panic attack, you are not yet ready or often even able to take a deep breath.

STEP 1: GROUNDING.

We want to bring your mind back from being dissociated or disconnected from reality and your surroundings and get grounded. If you’re sitting put your hands on the ground until you can actually feel it. You can also grab your body­ – your arms or your thighs to help you find your body again.

If you are standing you can say, “My feet are on the ground, my feet are on the ground, my feet are on the ground.” Anything that brings you back to your physical body. Whilst you’re doing this grounding, look around the room or the space that you are in. Name three or four things out loud that you can see. Example: “I can see my kettle, my shoes, my book, my phone. I can see my kettle, my shoes, my book, my phone.” If you are naming the things that are physically in front of you, your mind is no longer disconnected, your mind is back with your body because you’re in reality seeing and feeling what is in front of you.

STEP 2: BREATHE.

Now you’re ready for a breath. Now that you’re ‘back’ you can know where your lungs are, where your heart, and where your breath is. Take three to five deep breaths.

STEP 3 – REALITY CHECK

Ask yourself questions. What do I KNOW to be TRUE? What are the FACTS? Facts NOT thoughts. In the example above about wanting to resolve a conflict, what are the facts? Fact: You had a conflict. The conflict is unresolved on your side. The rest are thoughts, fears and anxieties. You do not KNOW how the other person is feeling, what will happen when you meet, whether it will escalate or de-escalate or anything else. Stick to the facts – there was a conflict. That is much less scary than where your anxiety-driven thoughts went.

In example two on our COVID19 related situation, you fear leaving the house. What are the facts? Is it a fact that if you leave the house you will definitely become infected? No. Is it a fact that if you touch a surface in a public space you will definitely become infected? No. Is it a fact that the virus does exist? Yes (depending on your belief system). Does that mean you have it? No. Are there safety precautions you can take? Yes. Again the facts are much less scary than where the anxiety-driven thoughts led you.

Don’t let fears become anxiety-driven thoughts. When we look at the facts, there are usually very, very few facts and the rest are thoughts and fears that lead to anxiety driven thoughts.

For any situation where you feel anxiety rising, whether you are sixteen or sixty, try and remember this 3-Step Process. 1. Grounding. 2. Breathe. 3. Reality Check. This should help calm down your situation so you are able to make decisions that are reasonable for you.

Source: ‘3-Step Process to Calm Anxiety,’/ Thrive Global.